The other side-effects of addiction

Lost fix

Ā© RecoveryMaldives

Getting through addiction and climbing up the ladder of recovery is not an easy task. Personally, I find the stopping part (of drugs) easier, than the challenges in recovery. This is mostly due to the baggage of our past we have to carry. The problem is the moment we ditch the baggage, it comes back haunting us. If I’m not ready to face my past head-on, the task of staying away from drugs gets harder.

I carry a lot of baggage from my past. These include issues of trust, integrity, numerous relationship damages, to name a few. There are times, if I sit and start to ponder over my past, the feeling of guilt and shame overrides the feeling of self-worthiness. The trip is too bad for me to handle, I tend to shun it, at least for that moment. This in turn bottles it up and sometimes makes it worse too. However, what I’ve found is time helps. As they say, time is the best healer and I truly believe that from experience.

As the journey of life continues and recovery gets stronger, which I’ve yet to experience, my belief is it will make things much easier. Life is not easy. Addiction was not easy, but honestly, for me, life is much harder; and that’s the beauty of life, I guess. Recovery gets challenging for me in every aspect of my life. To mend the broken bones, is not quite an easy task in itself. Having a reality-check helps a lot. Assessing the present situation and doing a little mental comparison helps too.

As time goes by, the other side-effects of addiction — the mental and spiritual part — becomes a memory.

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28 thoughts on “The other side-effects of addiction

  1. My friend,
    We all come with baggage and remorse for the past. The key for me wad to realize I didn’t have to deal with it all at once.Take one problem, make an effort at amends and enjoy the feeling that comes with the effort. Work the Steps, that’s why they are numbered 1 – 12. Much love in your recovery effort.

    Art

    • Hello friend,

      The problem is sometimes, if I start thinking about something from my past, I tend to dwell on it. It makes things worse.
      I’ll definitely take your pointer of taking things one by one.

      Thanks a lot, many blessings and well-wishes to you šŸ™‚

  2. Just take it as it comes. If you feel that something is too hard to think about right now then don’t think about it. When you’re strong enough in your recovery it will come back to you and you can handle it then. We have a tendency to try to do to much early in recovery…at least I did. I wanted it all to be better right away. I forgot that, as you say, time is the greatest healer and it took me a long time to get to where I was…it would likely take me at least as long to get back.

    This is a beautiful community – glad you’re here.

    Sherry

    • I’ll take your suggestions and apply that to practice. As you said, we tend to get boggled up in everything.
      Thank you so much for the kind words and being super supportive. Blessings to you šŸ™‚

  3. You are so right that recovery is a lot of work. You wrote, “If Iā€™m not ready to face my past head-on, the task of staying away from drugs gets harder.” Bravo! I feel the same way. I also believe that making peace with some of that past baggage, rather than unpacking it, is the better, healthier choice. Blessings, Joyce

  4. Best wishes on your recovery. I am an alcoholic and have not had a drink in over six years, but still have cravings every day, but they wane and only come in moments when I used to drink – cooking out on the grill, etc. A piece of advice I was given and use to this day is to tell yourself “I am not going to drink (or do drugs) today.” It is truly one day at a time. Also, replace the habit with a better one – walking, running, drinking fruit juices or eating more fruit, etc. – that helped me. Take care, BTG

    • That’s excellent advice and taking it a day at a time truly helps. Having the mental resolve is challenging sometimes and during the early recovery it’s easy to fall prey to momentary associations (not actual cravings) to the drink/drugs.
      As you said, I’m also trying to replace the time I spent on feeding my addiction; in fact, that’s one of the primary reasons why I started blogging.

      Thanks a lot for dropping by and for the support. šŸ™‚
      Hugs.

  5. We have our troubles and hardships. I commend your courage in being able to share this with others, in the hope that they too may recover. Thanks for stopping by my blog and I look forward to accompanying you on this journey.

  6. Thank you for your courage and honesty with us and yourself. Yes life is diffucult for everyone, addicts or not. I am a survivor(child) of an addict that was clean for many years before he gave up and his mental condition took over his will to continue the fight.Knowing people out there doing battle and winning, even a day at a time, gives hope and encouragement to others. my Dad’s story here if you have interest. God Bless. http://goroyboy.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/go-boy-breaking-chains/

    • I read your dad’s story and it’s a heart-wrenching one. I can understand what you went through and I can relate to so many things you have shared.
      I commend you for having the courage to spread the underlying message of your story to better the lives of others. I totally salute you!
      Thanks a lot for dropping by.

      Hope to see you again šŸ™‚

  7. I fall prey to rumination all the time. It’s hard not to let it go ’round and ’round in that head, like two ferocious dogs. I try to compartmentalize but it’s hard. I like what some other bloggers have mentioned here, just taking it bit by bit. day by day. Wishing you the best, lots of strength and peace. ~OTS

  8. This post speaks directly to me. I too carry a lot of baggage and guilt from my past. I can really let this get me down, and sometimes have a hard time finding my way out. It is almost reassuring to know I’m not alone; although I wouldn’t wish these “dips” on anyone.

    • I’m glad it resonated a vibe for you and it could relate to you as well. Sometimes, it’s very therapeutic to know we are not alone in this fight. I tell ya, we’re not!
      Thanks a lot and wish your strength and courage šŸ™‚

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